Melton prior Institut

Linton

Linton- Life in the Collections

William James Linton:

13) The House that Tweed built.

Cambridge / Mass. Nov. 1871

Brochure, 22 pages.

This pamphlet is targeted at New York’s infamous major William “Boss” Tweed and his unscrupulous Tammany Ring. “The Citizen’s Association of New York, centered in the Cooper Union, took a leading part in organizing the great Anti-Tweed meeting of 4 September, which had helped settle the fate of the Ring in the elections. The story of greed and depravity would have interested Linton for its own sake, but probably his associations with the Cooper Union deepened his involvement to the extent of writing and issuing the pamphlet.” (F.B. Smith

bildbildbild

bildbildbild

bildbildbild

bildbildbild

Next to Bob-Thin, the illustrated Tweed pamphlet represents a further stage of Linton’s examination of radical pictorial culture. It combines the early broadsheet tradition of British radical satire - namely Hone & Cruikshank’s Political house that Jack built - with the comparably popular cartoon campaigns of Thomas Nast and the satires of David Ross Locke. Locke was the most popular American political humorist of the era. Most of his books, which he wrote under the penname Petroleum V. Nasby, were illustrated with the rather refined cartoons by his friend Thomas Nast, but he also published pictorial pamphlets in a rough broadsheet manner, such as Swingin’ Round the Cirkle, or Andy’s trip to the West (1866), in which he lampooned a disastrous speaking campaign undertaken by President Andrew Johnson.

bildbildbild

bildbildbild